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A Glimpse into the Artist

I began my career in illustration and fine art photography with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute after attending Colorado State University and Minneapolis College of Art and Design.  My art is known for its energy, movement and technical mastery with a powerful yet elegant quality, drawn from my classical approach to sculpture.  I travel extensively to destinations such as Africa, Central and South America,   the Galapagos Islands, and the Antarctic, and draw on these experiences in creating my art.  My work, which is created in my Loveland studio, ranges in size from table-top to monumental.  The editions and commissions grace many private collections, both nationally and internationally, and public art programs.  I am an Elected Member of the National Sculpture Society (NSS), National Sculptors’ Guild Member, and a Signature Member of the Society of Animal Artists (SAA).

Juried Shows/Exhibits

  • 8/2017 Sculpture in the Park, Loveland, CO
  • 4/2017 Colorado Governor’s Show, Loveland Museum, Loveland, CO
  • 11/2016 Squash Blossom Gallery Featured Artist, Colorado Springs, CO
  • 9/16-1/17 56th Annual Society of Animal Artists Exhibition, Houston Museum of Natural History, Houston, TX
  • 8/2016 Sculpture in the Park, Loveland, CO
  • 4/2016 Colorado Governor’s Show, Loveland Museum, Loveland, CO
  • 2015 Sculpture in the Park, Loveland, CO
  • 2015 “All Creatures Great and Small”, National Sculpture Society, Naples, FL
  • 2013-2015 “Performance in Sculpture”, National Sculpture Society, Tampa, FL
  • 9/2014 “Casting Artwork in Bronze”,  American Foundry Association Conference, Coeur d’ Alene, ID
  • 5/2014 American Art Invitational, Saks Galleries, Denver, CO
  • 4/2014 Colorado Governor’s Show,  Loveland Museum, Loveland, CO
  • 4/2014 Art Show at the Dog Show, Wichita, KS
  • 2/2014 Two Person Show, Terzian Galleries, Park City, UT
  • 9/2013 53rd Annual Exhibition of SAA, Bennington, VT
  • 9/2013 International Birds in Art Exhibition, Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, WI
  • 8/2013 Featured Artist, Saks Galleries, Denver, CO
  • 8/2013 Sculpture in the Park, Loveland, CO
  • 4/2013 Colorado Governor’s Show, Loveland, CO
  • 12/2012 America Art Invitational Exhibition, Saks Galleries, Denver, CO
  • 9/2012 International Birds in Art Exhibition, Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, WI
  • 9/2012 52nd Annual Society of Animal Artists Exhibition, Hiram Blauvelt Art Museum, Oradell, New Jersey
  • 4/-6/2012 Colorado Governor’s Invitational Art Show and Sale, Loveland Museum, Loveland, CO
  • 3/-4/2012 25th Annual International Exhibition on Animals in Art, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, LA
  • 3/-4/2012 26th Annual Art Show at the Dog Show, Wichita, KS
  • 12/2011 Small Gems Exhibition, Saks Galleries, Denver, CO
  • 9/-12/2011 51st Annual Exhibition of the Society of Animals Artists, Dennos Museum Center, Traverse City, MI
  • 9/2011 International Birds in Art Exhibition, Wausau, WI
  • 9/2011 “Representing the West”, Sangre de Cristo Art Center, Pueblo, CO
  • 8/2011 2011 Sculpture in the Park, Loveland, CO

Awards

  • Art Show at the Dog Show 2012 and 2014, 2nd Place Sculpture,  Wichita, KS
  • Sculpture in the River Market 2010, Little Rock, AR – Honorable Mention
  • “Representing the West” Exhibition 2010, Sangre de Cristo Art Center, Pueblo, Colorado – Best in Show Sculpture
  • Art Show at the Dog Show 2010, Wichita, KS – Best German Shorthair Pointer

 

I try to bring out a certain unique aspect of the animal. Even with dogs, some are high energy, some are big and lumbering and the sweetest things in the world.” FRENCH BULLDOG was commissioned by a doctor whose canine companion accompanies him everywhere. Whenever the doctor is in conversation, the dog is by his side looking up with an inquisitive expression as if he understands every word. “I realize I might be anthropomorphizing to a certain extent,” the sculptor acknowledges, “but I think that even wild animals have more personality traits than people give them credit for.”

Daniel Glanz

Travel nourishes all of my senses and my psyche.  Being welcomed into another culture, such as Kenya, transforms my sensibilities as an artist and a citizen.  Kenya’s colors open the mind’s eye and witnessing nature and animals at a close distance urges me to pay attention to every detail.  My trips to the Galapagos Islands, the Antartic, Hawaii and Central and South America keep me deeply engaged and alert. A sculptor tends to look at things from top to bottom and all the way around. Observing from life is so important. It adds real perspective. It gives you the ability to determine whether something looks right. It needs to balance; it needs to flow; it needs to be anatomically accurate.

Daniel Glanz

Dan and Jonathan, Maasai Guide, Amboseli, Kenya

Daniel was the son of a man whose heart remained on the farm, but who worked as a CPA tax attorney to support nine children. His example of a strong work ethic was a significant influence in the sculptor’s life, as were early opportunities for encountering original art. When the family lived near Philadelphia, Dan would accompany his older brothers and sisters to concerts in the city’s sprawling Fairmount Park, where he saw public sculpture for the first time. He visited Philadelphia’s art museums, and when the family moved to Delaware, he cultivated a deep love of nature through time spent in the woods.

During high school, Glanz worked for a veterinarian and spent summers as a biological field assistant in southern California and Mexico’s Baja peninsula, trapping small mammals for research. “I was always interested in working with animals,” he says. At Colorado State University he enrolled in courses with a track to veterinary medicine, but he soon discovered, as he puts it, “My heart wasn’t in the books.” It was in art. Having spent countless hours drawing since he was a boy, he switched to art for two years at CSU and then left school for a year to do illustration work as a field assistant in Panama for the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

Read More

Gussie Fauntleroy

Journalist, Southwest Art / Presence & Personality, July 2013

The Rocky Mountain region of the American West is renowned for its natural beauty—rugged, snowcapped peaks, sweeping valley vistas, towering pine trees, delicate wildflowers—as well as its artistic splendor, with many noted sculptors living and working in this area. The region’s art festivals and galleries celebrate the best in American sculpture today, proving to be a visual paradise for serious collectors, art enthusiasts and tourists alike.

Take an inside look at this vibrant art scene as 97 contemporary sculptors share their favorite pieces along with firsthand insights on the inspiration and techniques behind them. The subjects and styles of their works range from traditional to contemporary and from representational to abstract. This guide is a must-have for collectors in search of artists, artists in search of ideas and visitors who want a beautiful memento of their time spent in this breathtaking landscape.

Daniel Glanz is one of the artists featured in this book.

Sculpture of the Rockies: 100 Contemporary & Traditional Artists

by Southwest Art Editors

This visually stunning book highlighted contemporary sculptors in the United States features the work of Daniel Glanz.

Best of America Sculpture Artists Volume II

Kennedy Promotions LLC / Kennedy Publishing, 2010

Birds, big cats, and bears: Daniel Glanz captures them all in his energetic and powerful bronze pieces. Glanz is known for his ability to depict a creature’s movement, whether it’s a lumbering elephant or an eagle in flight. “I think there is a disconnect between people and animals today,” he says. “Most of what I do is to try to reconnect them.”

A trip to the Falkland Islands several years ago served as the inspiration for COURTSHIP, a bronze depiction of two black-browed albatrosses on view at the Governor’s show. “The birds were all white with beautiful black eyebrows,” Glanz recalls.

Glanz describes this journey as a once-in-a-lifetime experience. On a small ship with 90 other passengers, Glanz traveled to Antarctica and South Georgia Island. The passenger list included a cadre of scientists, whose mission was to count penguins in one of their breeding grounds and rookeries on South Georgia Island. The experience of seeing 200,000 king penguins in one place was mind-blowing, Glanz says.

While some artists like to put what he calls a human spin on animal behavior, the Colorado-based sculptor says that isn’t realistic. For him, wildlife and animals are misunderstood—their behavior is completely different from that of humans.

“There are a lot of subtleties in their body language and vocalizations. It’s interesting to observe them. It’s like learning a different language,” Glanz says. “People should look at them in terms of who they are. That’s what I try to do in my works.”

Glanz, who lives in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, says he is fortunate to be able to observe an array of wildlife firsthand when he isn’t traveling. Wild turkeys converge in his yard, and bobcats, deer, mountain lions, and eagles are regular visitors, too.

Featured in April 2012.  

Southwest Art | March 15, 2012

Governor’s Invitational Art Show | Daniel Glanz